It makes you appreciate what you have, and what you can achieve both as an individual, and as a collective whole.

It makes you appreciate what you have, and what you can achieve both as an individual, and as a collective whole.

Yesterday, March 19, was a day set aside for documenting humanity all around the world.
With 2,702 photographers registered across 658 cities and 107 countries, my hourly contributions from Melbourne built up to form a collection of captures from midnight to midnight down under.
There was a group of us – old friends, new friends, familiar faces and new – who all met up and wandered together; sometimes as one, sometimes as a few, other times as a few more, occasionally alone.
We wandered the streets of Melbourne watching the city change from night to day to night, busy to slow, wet to dry, quiet to loud, hot to cold, happy to sad, awake to asleep.
Throughout the day you realise how humanity is not only about individuals, about groups, group dynamics, society as a whole and the environment amongst which it is found. Not only about the present, but also the past and how it plays to form the future.
Not only about the people, but also about their place – physically and mentally – in this wonderful world. It makes you appreciate what you have, and what you can achieve both as an individual, and as a collective whole.
This was my third year participating, and although I implemented a lot of what I had learnt previously, I did not manage all. I meant to sleep prior to the midnight starting point but it did not happen… I had to battle tiredness, attitude, emotions, weather, power, purpose, sore feet, and some. Unexpectedly and overwhelmingly ending up in tears from fears around 6.30pm I almost cut the day short, but no, I was committed and I would see it through no matter what. I cannot let this shit detrimentally effect and affect my life when it does, I must work through it; and I did.
This was taken at the end, at one minute past twelve on March 20, as I sat on my midnight train circling the city before heading South-East. I was home just after 1 and asleep by 1.20, having been awake for 42 hours!!
This project is tough, but worth it.